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Daphne du Maurier Southern Books
 
 
Members Forum Archive - 1999

I'm looking into the origins of the surname Favell and noticed that there is a character, Jack Favell, in the novel Rebecca. Does anyone have any information about the character basis or anything else that may prove helpful? thanks.
Vanessa <Vanessawilson@bigfoot.com>
- Tuesday, December 21, 1999 at 09:44:08 (GMT)
I had never heard of Daphne until I ran on to a picture of her on this site...she writes just the way she looks...a very removed yet sensitive woman...her picture leaves an impression much the same as her writing...a kind of person you want to carry away and protect yet doesn't need protection ...I don't like the feeling of wanting or chasing something out of reach..although it seems to be her forte... to draw you close and keep you at a distance at the same time...a quality which makes you suffer in her behalf....a rare pearl in deed
Gary Brumley <geebee@webzone.net>
- Monday, December 20, 1999 at 03:35:11 (GMT)
I had never heard of Daphne until I ran on to a picture of her on this site...she writes just the way she looks...a very removed yet sensitive woman...her picture leaves an impression much the same as her writing...a kind of person you want to carry away and protect yet doesn't need protection ...I don't like the feeling of wanting or chasing something out of reach..although it seems to be her forte... to draw you close and keep you at a distance at the same time...a quality which makes you suffer in her behalf....a rare pearl in deed
Gary Brumley <geebee@webzone.net>
- Monday, December 20, 1999 at 03:32:14 (GMT)
Help!! I finished "Rebecca" at the weekend and thoroughly enjoyed it. However, I still have a couple of questions which for me weren't entirely clear at the end. Firstly, what happened to Manderley in the end? And secondly, why were Maxim and the second Mrs. de Winter apparently living abroad in later years (from the beginning of the book)? I'd really appreciate some enlightenment on these points - thank you. I also loved and recommend "Jamaica Inn"!! E-mail: athenamckay@hotmail.com Thanks, Athena McKay.
Athena McKay <athenamckay@hotmail.com>
- Wednesday, December 08, 1999 at 15:30:40 (GMT)
i love du mauriers cigarettes
smokey wiccan <2626@wrhs.ednet.ns.ca>
- Tuesday, December 07, 1999 at 18:59:03 (GMT)
I am doing a research paper on Du Maurier's book "Rebecca". We are to discuss the text of the book in terms of myths, values, beliefs, stereotypes, heroes and formula, and what relationship these elements might have with the intended reading audience. Any help would be greatly appreciated!!
Cathi <msmuffet2@aol.com>
- Tuesday, December 07, 1999 at 01:45:54 (GMT)
I had never read a novel by Daphne until this semester when I chose The House On The Strand for my english ISU. I am now in the process of writing my final essay about the book and i have to define the theme which I am having difficulty wording. I would greatly appreciate it if anyone could email me their ideas or knowledge about this! Thanks so much!!
Krystle <juniorhockeyfan@hotmail.com>
- Saturday, December 04, 1999 at 23:25:49 (GMT)
Can anyone tell me if there was a character or place named "Lerryn" in any of Daphne du Maurier's books or stories? Thanks, Mildred Upton
Mildred Upton <tjack@emeraldis.com>
- Saturday, December 04, 1999 at 20:05:52 (GMT)
Im am doing a research project on Daphne du Maurier, do you know of any good sites with information and pictures?
Rebekah <rat_bekah_1@yahoo.com>
- Thursday, December 02, 1999 at 21:04:53 (GMT)
Im am doing a research project on Daphne du Maurier, do you know of any good sites with information and pictures?
Rebekah
- Thursday, December 02, 1999 at 21:03:53 (GMT)
Hi. I am senior in High School and I have to do my research paper on "Rebecca" and how the 1930's influenced Daphne du Maurier on writing this book. If anyone could help me out with this, it would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
Tim <t_walters@geocities.com>
- Tuesday, November 30, 1999 at 17:07:59 (GMT)
I'M IN MY SECOND YEAR OF HIGH SCHOOL AND I HAD TO DO A CRITICAL ANAYLSIS ON THE BOOK REBECCA AND ITS ONE THE BEST BOOKS I EVER READ. THE WAY DAPHNE ORGANIZES EVERYTHING TO HAPPEN IS GREAT. I DEFINITELY WANT TO READ MORE OF HER BOOKS.
Madeleine <MLSG15@aol.com>
- Monday, November 29, 1999 at 22:11:59 (GMT)
Am I mistaken or am I the only person who has read and/or enjoyed "The King's General"? I see little to no mention of it and wonder if it has been overlooked by many of her readers.
Rebecca <rbrown@jmg-law.com>
- Wednesday, November 24, 1999 at 17:51:08 (GMT)
I just finished reading Rebecca, at the suggestion of a dear friend, and I was amazed! I have never read a book that related to me on such a personal level. Excellent! There was such a sense of urgency and current-application to it. I am a college student and I'm amazed I never had to read this in high school- I just read it for pleasure. So now I am going to the library and getting some more of her works. any suggestions for the next book to read? Email me with comments. rayn ;)
rayn <rmunn@kent.edu>
- Tuesday, November 23, 1999 at 17:27:39 (GMT)
I fear that I may never see a dramatisation of any of Daphne's work to equal the Olivier/Fontaine 'Rebecca', or the deHavilland/Burton 'My Cousin Rachel'. While I remember enjoyed the Jeremy Brett version, I feel, personally, that it was a pale shadow of the earlier version. As for the version containing nudity (shock horror!!) I must have thought it pretty bad, because I am unable to call it to mind! I seem to have wiped it from my memory. I hasten to add that I have objection to acting in the buff, provided it seems appropriate to the plot, and is done with taste, and without titillation. I admit that our perceptions of these matters may well vary from person to person, but dont think, with apologies to Mr Davis, that turning Daphne's flesh and blood characters into pale romantic images is good either!
Sam <Samrim@talk21.com>
- Saturday, November 20, 1999 at 09:05:58 (GMT)
Everyone agrees that the Jeremy Brett/Joanna David TV version of 'Rebecca' was wonderful. Do we also agree that the recent version on British TV which strayed from the plot and even contained nudity was utterly frightful?
Richard Davis <wrdavis@ibm.net>
- Tuesday, November 16, 1999 at 20:14:37 (GMT)
whats wrong with being enthusiast-I hope the previous contributor can find something as fine to be 'over the top' obour best wishes
Sam <SamRim@talk21.com>
- Saturday, November 13, 1999 at 09:32:42 (GMT)
KT at Nope might ask themselves
Sam <SamRim@talk21.com>
Scunthorpe, UK - Saturday, November 13, 1999 at 09:26:36 (GMT)
This is weird. Du Maurier is an excellent writer, but there is no need to be obsessed.
KT <NOPE>
- Wednesday, November 10, 1999 at 18:19:30 (GMT)
Hi! I'm currently studying for an A-level in English Literture and I have just completed reading Jamaica Inn. I enjoyed this book and have decided to study it for coursework. I'd be really grateful if anyone could send me some info on it or the author as I'm having trouble finding some. Thanx!!
Liz Medley <johnmedley@wingrove1.freeserve.co.uk>
- Thursday, November 04, 1999 at 16:34:38 (GMT)
I just read her book Rabecca and I loved it! one of the best books I've ever read!
kjersti
- Wednesday, November 03, 1999 at 17:12:16 (GMT)
I have read the Margaret Forster Biography on Daphne Du Maurier and found it to be an excellent and very enjoyable book on the life of a fantastic author - she was neither too fawning or too critical - just stated the facts and in a very readable way - I'd recommend this book to all fans.
DENISE McD
- Tuesday, November 02, 1999 at 18:56:46 (GMT)
Calling Maren Bonacker - You have a message on this page re your PhD on Daphne du Maurier. Your e-mail address doesn't work - please e-mail me for some stuff I can send you.
Sharon Lowenna <sharon@falmouth.ac.uk>
- Saturday, October 30, 1999 at 16:59:50 (BST)
I am presently 'investigating' all the circumstances of 'The House on the Strand'. As I do not know anything about the evolution of the book and how much reality of Mrs. du Maurier's life is included I would really be happy if someone helped me with this topic. I also do not know wether the setting exists in real or not. Please excuse me for not writing in perfect english - I keep trying... Axel Breuer
Axel Breuer <axel.breuer@bavaria-film.de>
- Tuesday, October 26, 1999 at 09:02:10 (BST)
Daphne du Maurier has been my favorite author for years. Rebecca is my favorite book, and has been since high school. I have read many of her short story collections, my favorite being The Breaking Point. Her tact and suspence keep me intregued and delighted throughout her novels. I read Rebecca over and over again, and every time I discover something new and wonderful about it. Dame du Maurier had such a way of sucking in the reader and making him a part of the story. I feel as though I am the second Mrs. de Winter every time I read Rebecca. Her novels are a joy.
Kristee Burch
- Thursday, October 21, 1999 at 22:59:54 (BST)
Hello Laura, Like you, I'm devoted to Daphne's work, and I admire her very much. I was very sad when she died. I learned a lot about her personality and character when I found and read a book that was published in 1992. It is 'Daphne du Maurier-Letters from Menabilly-Portrait of a Friendship', edited by the letters recipient, Oriel Malet. The letters spanned along period from the 1950's to the 1980's. They met by chance and became friends, and wrote to each other regularly. 'Reading between the lines', Daphne really was a lovely human being, no wonder we think so much of her. `I picked up a second hand copy (for £6.99) in a second hand bookshop in Scarborough; it's published by M. Evans and Company Inc, 216 east 49th Street, New York, New York 10017. I haven't come across the book by Martyn Shallcross yet, but will keep an eye open for it! Have you been to the 'Daphne du Maurier Festival of Art and Literature' in Fowey, in May? I went for the first time this year and it was brilliant. It may sound stuffy to some but wasn't at all. There were celebrity talks,walks (around the book 'sites'), boat trips, films, music, and lasted for ten days. I stayed at the Safe Harbour Hotel, with a pub full of devotees (like you and me!), and it was a really magic time. I',m off again next May, as are all the others. The web site does have a section devoted to the Festival, but if you need more info, do let me know. Oh, and my favourite books are Rebecca first, closely followed by My cousin Rachel and House on the Strand. Daphne really didn't write love stories did she-apart,arguably 'Frenchman's Creek', which I didn't care much for, or 'Loving Spirit', which although good, always seems to show its 'youthful' origins. Daphne was quite young when she had that initial success, wasn't she? Her books all seem to have a sinister edge, which can be quite unsettling -I think anyway! Best Wishes Sam Rimington SamRim@talk21.com PS tried to Email the above but apparently our systems wont talk to each other-so the server said,anyway!
Sam Rimington <SamRim@talk21.com>
- Thursday, October 21, 1999 at 21:02:15 (BST)
Hi! I come from Cyprus, a little island in the Mediterranean Sea. Daphe Du Maurier is said to have visited the island and a particular place in Cyprus inspired her to write her most well-known novel "Rebecca." This place is called Platres. It is a village, up in the mountains, in the city of Limassol. Daphne is believed to have spent some time there with her husband and daughter. Specifically, she is said to have stayed at the Forest Park Hotel. The landscape which is described in Rebecca as the place of the exile for the girl, is exactly the same as the landscape one can enjoy sittin at the balcony of one of the rooms in above-mentioned hotel. There are pictures of the particular place in Cyprus at the time "Rebecca" was being written.
Anna Nicolaou <annanic@spidernet.com.cy>
- Wednesday, October 20, 1999 at 21:04:52 (BST)
I agree with you Josh, Dahne's site is really good, especially those Items that have memories of the great lady (Daphne du Maurier/Lady Browning). It would have been a great honour to meet her wouldn't it-although i expect I'd have been completely 'tongue-tied'. I think we all owe a big vote of thanks to John Baxendale, who originally built the site! Haveyou any personal memories of Daphne, John. I,ve walked near her homes in and near her Homes in fowey, Cornwall-thats the nearest I've got!
sam rimington <Samrim@talk21.com>
- Monday, October 18, 1999 at 22:28:25 (BST)
your website is good
Josh MacEachern <Creamy_King@hotmail.com>
- Monday, October 18, 1999 at 17:14:17 (BST)
REBECCA has been one of my favorite books since high school and I am still getting it as a reading assignment in college!!!! For those of you who just stumbled upon this web site and haven't yet read this book by Daphne, pleas do and I think that you will enjoy it. Now this goes for you men out there as well. Most of the guys who I know who have read this book have enjoyed it because I don't think it is you typical romance novel!!!! Have fun reading!!!:)
Elizabeth Funsch <bookworm2301@yahoo.com>
- Monday, October 18, 1999 at 16:57:21 (BST)
I am a massive fan of all Daphne`s books and only wish that I had been able to meet her. I really enjoyed the Forster Biography and 'The Private World of Daphne du Maurier' by Martyn Shallcross. I would really like to get in touch with other people who are really enthusiastic about her books. I love all her short stories but my favourite of her books is 'The Scapegoat'. I look forward to hearing from other like minded Daphne fans. Laura V.
Laura Varnam <varnaml@PCHS.Cheshire.SCH.uk>
- Monday, October 18, 1999 at 14:07:58 (BST)
Hi ! I'm hoping that u will add some samples of Miss Daphne 's writings in this website so everyone can read it .. Thanks!
LEon
- Saturday, October 16, 1999 at 13:17:56 (BST)
Hello Sabrina-there is a biograpghy of Daphne by Margaret forster which may be useful. I've not read it but I gather from the newspaper reviews that it was (rightly or wrongly) rather contoversial. if your library cant get u a copy why not try one of the bigger bookshops, or amazon.com
sam rimington <Samrim@talk21.com>
- Friday, October 15, 1999 at 19:23:31 (BST)
Hello George I'm pretty certain that I've seen the video of Rebecca (with Joanna David and Jeremy Brett (?) in one of the big media shops- possibly Richard Branson's 'Virgin' organization. If I'm wrong-or more likely out of date, why not try amazon.com, or the amazon.com auction site? Best Wishes
Sam Rimington <SamRim@talk21.com>
- Friday, October 15, 1999 at 19:18:26 (BST)
Has the 1978 BBC film of Rebecca with Jeremy Brett and Joanna David ever been released to video. If not, why not?
George Burton <george_burton@yahoo.co.uk>
- Thursday, October 14, 1999 at 23:46:27 (BST)
I've read Rebecca for my trinity, and I need to find her biography, I think it would be useful to put her biography in internet for people to see it.
Sabrina <sabri_fm@sanmarcos.org.ar>
- Tuesday, October 12, 1999 at 19:46:15 (BST)
I am desperately searching for a copy of Rebecca in the beautiful hardcopy Basic Books edition. It is printed in England. I think Basic Books is a subsidary of Reed Publishing. Any leads?
Jeff <claman@interchange.ubc.ca>
- Monday, October 11, 1999 at 00:31:11 (BST)
Question: Does the heroine in Rebecca have a name? (Max alludes to her unusal name, but is it ever revealed?) Thanks!
Lauren from the U.S.A.
- Sunday, October 10, 1999 at 20:17:34 (BST)
Question: Does the heroine in Rebecca have a name? (Max alludes to her unusal name, but is it ever revealed?) Thanks!
Lauren from the U.S.A.
- Sunday, October 10, 1999 at 20:17:34 (BST)
I am doing a project at school on Rebecca i think it is a brilliant bbook
Katy Wilson
- Sunday, October 10, 1999 at 10:57:31 (BST)
hello people well i am doing this for a bokk report the bokk that i am reading is called REBECCA i was wanting to know if someone has read that if so i can not understand it so if you understand it can you please e-mail me. thanks a bunch, heather*
Heather <heather_clark@hotmail.com>
- Sunday, October 10, 1999 at 00:52:21 (BST)
I just finished reading Rebecca. It was great, one of the best books i have ever read. DOES ANYONE KNOW HOW THE BOOK RELATES TO MODERN ISSUES? I would greatly appreciate it if you email me telling me how it relates to modern issues. I have to do this for english. Thank you
Meghan <Fitchead@aol.com>
- Thursday, October 07, 1999 at 00:26:00 (BST)
I have enjoyed reading Ms. duMaurier since I was 15 years old. I have written about her and continue to be fascinated by her life and her works. I have been to the Daphne duMaurier Festival of Arts and Literature twice, in 1998 and in 1999. Fowey is extraordinary and I walked the grounds of Menabilly, an experience I shall never forget as long as I live.
Christine Bagley <cbagley@vision.eri.harvard.edu>
- Tuesday, October 05, 1999 at 21:06:16 (BST)
I have read Rebecca many times and consider it a classic. It was only later that I realized that The Birds and Don't Look Now were also her work. I found House on the Strand at a garage sale and was told by the seller that it was the worst book she had ever read; I knew immediately that it would be a personal favorite of mine. It takes intelligence and sensitivity to appreciate what Daphne Du Maurier has bequeathed us and unfortunately in our world today that combination is a rarity.
Sharon
- Tuesday, October 05, 1999 at 01:28:55 (BST)
I think daphne du Maurier is the best writer in the world.
Brandy Beyer
- Monday, October 04, 1999 at 19:50:13 (BST)
I am an English teacher from Buenos Aires, Argentina.Every year we choose "Rebecca" as a book to read with the senior students.They always find it fascinating and it's a pleasure for me to read it over and over again together with my students. Thanks Daphne du Maurier for making my students love literature and encourage them to read.
Sabrina Fidel <sabrinafid@hotmail.com>
- Thursday, September 30, 1999 at 23:03:54 (BST)
Our book group has chosen "Rebecca" as our selection for the month of October, 1999 and we are pleased to have found such an informative web site devoted to her!
Lauren from Indiana, U.S.A.
- Friday, September 24, 1999 at 18:49:31 (BST)
After reading Rebecca in class, me and my students (Form 10, 16 years old) embarked on a little creative writing project. In the following, you will find a description of what everybody was supposed to do and, as a matter of course, the final results. We hope you'll like them. Add an additional chapter ( chapter 6 a, 6 b, 6 c) to the novel, thereby allowing for the following criteria: Chapter 6 a Maxim, Frank Crawley and Giles talk about the "fatal misunderstanding" at the fancy-dress dance and discuss its potential consequences for the future of the relationship between Maxim and the new Mrs de Winter (...) Chapter 6 b Maxim discovers that it was Mrs Danvers who persuaded his young wife into wearing the clothes from the picture in the hall and takes her to task for this, getting a somewhat disrespectful response (...) Chapter 6 c On a trip to London the new Mrs de Winter meets Mrs Van Hopper again,tells her about her marriage in general and the fancy-dress dance in particular and is given some "good advice" for her personal future (...) creative writing rules: 1) working time: two lessons, 2) at the end of the two lessons, there must be a "finished product" available (computer-typed !!), 3) the chapter should fit in with the rest of the novel (style, tense, etc.), 4) all members of the group should take part (the name of every member should be found on the script), 5) basically make use of your own vocabulary; if necessary, consult the dictionary or the teacher ... Good luck Joerg Bartikowski   Chapter 6 a (I) The secret talk about the new Mrs. de Winter The next morning Maxim, Frank, Giles, Mrs. Danvers, Beatrice and I sat in the dining-room and took breakfast. It was a very embarrassing situation for me, because there was a strange atmosphere and I did not want to look into the eyes of the others. They did not speak much and after a short time Maxim, Frank and Giles left the room and I wondered that they did not say where they wanted to go. Beatrice and Mrs. Danvers sat next to me, but they behaved in a mysterious way. I was sure that Mrs. Danvers had given me the advice with the dress on purpose. The near of them made me feel very sad. So I decided to go upstairs and to take a rest. I left the room without saying anything and I felt their looks in my back. While I walked along the east wing corridor, I heard some voices discussing something. Because I am a very curious person I wanted to have detailed information about this talk. Suddenly I heard the voice of Maxim who had mentioned my name with his strong voice. The door was closed, but now I was really interested to get to know what they had to talk about me without my presence. "At first I was really shocked, because it seemed to me that my wife wanted to copy Rebecca. She always compared herself with Rebecca and asked me a lot of private questions about her life and how she was and behaved." "Yes, I remember that she also asked me things like that. I tried to encourage her and showed her with my words that she has qualities of her own like honesty and kindness. It makes no sense when she is not self-confident, I have often tried to convince her." I supposed it was Frank. Then I heard Giles with an energetic voice. "Believe me Maxim, she did it on purpose. She has a big problem with your past and she will not get rid of it." "Another big problem are the news and reporters who spread rumours about Manderley which will destroy Manderley's reputation." That was one of Maxim's typical reactions when he thought something reflected up on his sacred Manderley. For a short period of time it was silent in this room and I thought the talk had finished. My heart was beating, because I supposed they would come out and see me. But then Giles restarted the discussion and began to criticise me once again. "She projects the past into the future and so she brings up the old pain again." Now it was Maxim's turn to finish the talk. "Actually it makes no sense to talk about all these strange affairs. I love her the way she is and how she normally behaves, because she is the most important person for me and in my opinion she is the one who can lead us away from the past. She must find her own qualities and in the future I will convince her of that." It was a big relief for me, because I had thought Manderley was the most important thing for Maxim, for we had talked less with each other from day to day. However, I was not sure if he had been serious about what he had said. (by Katrin Austrup, Lea Becker, Nina Daweke, Ivonne Schulte) ----------------------------
Chapter 6 a (II)
After the dance
The ball was over now and I was still sitting on my bed and thought about what had happened. I had tried to catch some sleep, but Maxim's pale and shocked face could not get out of my mind. I still heard Mrs Danvers laughing and blamed myself for not noticing that something was wrong with her suggestion to wear this dress. But how about Maxim? How could I explain to him that I had not done that on purpose and that I could not know that it was Rebecca's last dress. I decided to go downstairs and to speak with Maxim about that fatal misunderstanding though I was afraid of Maxim's reaction. I walked up the corridor and when I was standing in front of Maxim's door, I heard some voices in the room. I just wanted to knock on the door when suddenly my name was mentioned. I recognised the voices of Maxim, Frank and Giles loudly discussing the fancy dress-dance. "I can't imagine that. It's unbelievable that she did it on purpose," I heard Maxim say. "lt was only a matter of bad luck." "Oh no, Frank. I think she wanted to copy Rebecca. Who does not want to be as beautiful and delightful as her?'' Giles said. "But she has other outstanding qualities like kindness, honesty and modesty. She needn't slip into Rebecca's role." I felt that Frank was my only real friend. "It's obvious that she cannot compete with Rebecca. And she knows that everybody thinks this way." "Giles! How can you say that!" "Life at Manderley is not easy for her... She's so different from Rebecca, and she's not used to this kind of life here . We all have to think about that. Good night, I want to sleep now.'' I heard Maxim's footsteps coming towards the door. I got nervous, and my heart was beating fast. I hid behind the curtains, and after Maxim had passed by, I also wanted to leave. While I was going up to my room, I saw Frank and Giles coming into the hall. "Good night, Giles." "lt would be the best for them to separate. Good night, Frank." I was so badly upset than never before. When I was in my bed again later, I asked myself if this would be the end of our relationship. I did not want to believe it, but it seemed to me as if I had to believe. (by Eva Baresel, Miako Klein, Kathrin Moellers, Rebecca Muer, Lili Schoen) ----------------------------
Chapter 6 b (I)
The argument with Mrs Danvers
I do not know how long I had been sitting there. I could not move. My body was like frozen, while my mind over and over replayed everything that had happened. The preparations for the dance, the advice of Mrs Danvers, my naive anticipation and finally the look Maxim had given to me. I shall never forget in my whole life the expression in his face when he saw me walking down the stairs. How different he had been in the first weeks of our marriage! Now he looked so much older and he almost seemed like a stranger to me. Our short luck would be destroyed now. A stupid misunderstanding would tear us apart, would make us behave like strangers. It had all been my fault. My dress had brought back the past to Maxim. Now he would never be able to forget Rebecca. When he looked into my eyes it could never be the same.The feeling of having failed in all things I had done did not leave me. I stood up slowly and went to the mirror. My face looked pale and so sad. I had not realized it, but it had become silent in the house. All the guests would have gone by now, I thought. I wondered why Maxim did not come up to our room. I opened the door and walked slowly to the stairs. As I leant against the balustrade, the memory of Maxim's expression came back to me and made me shiver. Downstairs the room lay empty, moonlight was shining through a window. Then I heard some footsteps. Maxim walked across the hall, calling out: "Mrs Danvers!" His angry, grim look frightened me. But Maxim had not seen me . I walked downstairs where I met Frank Crawley who was standing alone in the hall. At the moment that he saw me, his face suddenly got a worried look. "How do you do?"he asked. "You'd better go back to bed. Don't worry too much. It was a misunderstanding. You couldn't possibly have known." I did not know what to say. I suddenly felt so tired as never before in my life. "What is Maxim doing?" I asked. "Oh" said Frank and looked quite disturbed. "He is searching for Mrs Danvers. Maxim and I have talked about the matter and I said it might be possible that it was Mrs Danvers who gave you the idea to copy that dress from the picture. After all, she's the only person who knows about it and thus could have told you. Maxim wants to talk to her right now." "Oh" I said stupidly.I felt awkward and for a while, neither of us said a word. Then we heard the voices of Maxim and Mrs Danvers. "Is that true? Is that really the truth? You told my wife to copy that dress from the picture in the hall?" Maxim was almost shouting. I had only once seen him upset like this. The anger in his voice frightened me. Suddenly I realized how cold it actually was in the hall, but I just remained standing there, because I did not want to miss a word of the conversation. I was waiting to hear the cold, dead voice of Mrs Danvers answer, but nothing happened for a while. I could imagine how she would be looking at that moment, her face pale and unmoved, an evil look in her eyes. Maxim spoke again. "Oh, you don't need to answer at all.I know that it was you! You are the most wicked person I ever met!" "Don't take that tone with me, Mr de Winter.", Mrs Danvers suddenly hissed. "I know that you wish I'd be leaving your house, but you cannot give me the notice to quit this job. I could get you very much in trouble and you know that. I think you do understand what I mean." Maxim did not say a word. "I wonder what she's talking about!", I whispered to Frank, but he did not answer either. It was so silent I could hear him breathe. Now Maxim said in a low voice: "I know you've been admiring Rebecca. However, she has been dead for one year now." He paused shortly, then he said: "Why on earth do you hate my wife? What right do you have to make her scared like that? After all, there's no sense in trying to tear us apart, but that's what you want, don't you?" Mrs Danvers answered, although I wished she hadn't done it. "You are a fool, that's what you are. Rebecca died and you tried to forget her by marrying another woman as fast as possible. But how can you stand comparing your new wife to the way Rebecca was? I tell you, this stupid thing won't stay in this house for long. And listen to me, Rebecca will never leave you!" Maxim suddenly came running out of the room. He saw Frank and me standing there, but he just gave a very strange glance to me and then went outside. I did not follow him, but said "Good night" to Frank and went to bed. I was too tired to think or even worry about what I had just heard. (by Eva Daniel, Annabelle Heidinger, Anne Liekenbrock, Laura Schubert) ----------------------------
Chapter 6 b (II)
Maxim's discovery
I asked myself if I should tell Beatrice the reason for wearing the clothes from the picture. I wasn't sure how Beatrice would react and what she thought about Mrs Danvers in general. Then I decided to tell her the whole story. Beatrice didn't seem very surprised and she told me that she thought that Mrs Danvers was a mysterious person with a lot of different faces. We finished our conversation and Beatrice went out of my room and I was alone again. The next morning I heard by sheer chance how Maxim took Mrs Danvers to task. "I want to talk to you about the fancy-dress dance, Mrs Danvers." "Your new wife behaved like a fool. It was like Rebecca's ghost had come down. She shocked everyone." "Why do you think had she chosen this dress?" "I don't know." "You don't know!!?? Don't tell me that! I know that you know!" "What do you mean?" "You and I know that you persuaded my wife into wearing the same fancy-dress dance dress which Rebecca had worn at the last fancy-dress dance." "Why do you imagine this? Why should I have acted that way?"? "You did! Don't tell me you didn't. It is your last chance; if something like this happens again I will give you the sack." At this moment Jasper stood behind me and barked. I got a real shock. Then I took Jasper for a walk. (by Verena Beinker, Katrin Beitzel, Carina Dreher, Lara Goedeke) ----------------------------
Chapter 6 c (I)
The unforeseen meeting
The next day I woke up early in the morning. I wanted to be on my own, above all far away from Mrs Danvers and Maxim. So I sneaked out of the room while Maxim was still sleeping and took a taxi to the station to go to London by train. During the ride, while having breakfast, I had some time to think about my mistakes. I couldn't believe why I had been so naive to trust in Mrs Danvers. I reached London at 2 p.m. and decided to go shopping to direct my thoughts away from Manderley and its surroundings. "This dress suits you very well," the saleswoman said." It's lovely, Madame - fit for the queen of England." That voice was very well- known to me, but I couldn't classify it. There were thousands of thoughts in my mind. Could Mrs Danvers have followed me? But why should she have done so? My heart was beating faster. At the next moment a hand touched my shoulder and turned me round. Slowly I opened my eyes. " Mrs Van Hopper," I shouted, "oh, you have given me some kind of a shock. I didn't expect you!" "I saw you walking into this shop, Honey! So I also went inside to meet you. We will have coffee now, won't we?" "Oh, of course. Let's go to the nice café round the corner!" Being surprised as well as happy for having someone to talk about my problems I went along with her. While having coffee I told her about my "career" at Manderley, about Mrs Danvers, about my experiences in general and especially about the Fancy Dress Dance which had been the reason to come to London to direct my thoughts away from that horrible event. " Oh dear, that's terrible, but you know I could have told that to you all before, don't you?", Mrs van Hopper said. " But you didn't want to listen to me, did you? The only thing I can tell you now is to get away from your surroundings. Come back to Monte Carlo. At any time you are very welcome to be my companion again. That's the only chance to escape from your problems. Don't forget this. I'll always be your friend." After this conversation and after we had said goodbye to each other, I went back to Manderley with the last train in the evening, my mind now filled with more problems than before the trip. Questions about leaving Maxim and also Manderley and its surroundings tormented myself. I was none the wiser. (by Markus Dekiff, Manuel Holtkoetter, Malte Metzner, Malte Schulz) ----------------------------
Chapter 6 c (II)
The surprising meeting
The next week I went up to London for shopping and for getting distance to the relationship with Maxim. For having tea I went into a cafÉ. I sat down in a corner and ordered a cup of tea. While I was waiting for my order, suddenly Mrs. Van Hopper came in. She noticed me and requested to be placed at my table. I was very surprised to see her there, because I expected her to be in Monte Carlo. She wanted to know about my state of mind and wondered what had happened to me in the meantime. "How are you?" "Thank you, I'm fine", I answered. "Did you have a beautiful marriage and a wonderful journey to Italy?" "Yes, we did, " I said, "but now there is a little crisis between us. " "Oh, what happened? Tell me about it. " "Rebecca is still in everybody's mind and I get the feeling that Maxim still loves her. That became obvious to me last week when we had a fancy-dress dance at Manderley. I had problems to get dressed and Mrs. Danvers persuaded me to copy a dress from a picture in the hall. However, when I went downstairs wearing that dress, everybody was staring at me and seemed to be shocked. Suddenly Maxim shouted at me and forced me to change clothes." "Oh, why did he react in such a sensitive way?" "At first I didn't know either, but then Beatrice told me that my dress was the same as the one Rebecca had worn at the last Fancy-Dress Dance before her death." "Oh, that was very shrewd by Mrs.Danvers", Mrs. van Hopper replied. "And in what way will it go on with you and Maxim?" "I really don't know. Maybe you can help me. What would you do if you were in my place?" "Oh, it's really hard to say. I think I would go to Maxim and discuss our problems with him." "Oh, I will do my best, but I don't think that it will change the situation." "Why are you so sure? Have you ever tried before?" "No, I haven't, but I can't imagine that he is interested in my problems." "Nevertheless, I think you should have a try. Furthermore, I think that it will take some more time till everybody will have forgotten the past and accept you as the new Mrs. de Winter." Then we finished our meeting. "Thank you for your advice, but now I must go home. " "I wish you a nice journey. Good bye", Mrs. van Hopper said. "Thank you very much. I wish you the same, bye". (by Patrick Brett, Sebastian Kosmeier, Martin J. Kuehn, Thomas Stork)
Joerg Bartikowski, c/o Gymnasium St. Mauritz, D-48155 Muenster (Germany) <mauri8@muenster.de>
- Friday, September 24, 1999 at 18:22:19 (BST)
Whilst doing some family history research through the familytreemaker web site I was directed towards your site . Imagine my delight when I read the article about Menabilly as contributed by Martin Dyer.It transpires that we have the same great grandfather Charles Barrett Dyer, the article having been written by Martins father.If anyone can help me to contact Martin Dyer I would be most grateful.Most of my childhood days were spent visiting Golant, and it was marvellous to read of my family's association with Menabilly as I used to enjoy reading the novels of Daphne du Maurier.
Malcolm Graham <mac@mac.eurobell.co.uk>
- Thursday, September 23, 1999 at 20:23:10 (BST)
Whilst doing some family history research through the familytreemaker web site i was directed towards your site . Imagine my delight when I read the article about Menabilly as contributed by Martin Dyer.It transpires that we have the same great grandfather Charles Barrett Dyer, the article having been written by Martins father.If anyone can help me to contact Martin Dyer I would be most grateful.Most of my childhood days were spent visiting Golant, and it was marvellous to read of my family's association with Menabilly as I used to enjoy reading the novels of Daphne du Maurier.
Malcolm Graham <mac@mac.eurobell.co.uk>
- Thursday, September 23, 1999 at 20:22:15 (BST)
Whilst doing some family history research through the familytreemaker web site i was directed towards your site . Imagine my delight when I read the article about Menabilly as contributed by Martin Dyer.It transpires that we have the same great grandfather Charles Barrett Dyer, the article having been written by Martins father.If anyone can help me to contact Martin Dyer I would be most grateful.Most of my childhood days were spent visiting Golant, and it was marvellous to read of my family's association with Menabilly as I used to enjoy reading the novels of Daphne du Maurier.
malcolm graham <mac@mac.eurobell.co.uk>
- Thursday, September 23, 1999 at 20:21:16 (BST)
Whilst doing some family history research through the familytreemaker web site i was directed towards your site . Imagine my delight when i read the article about menabilly as contributed by Martin Dyer.It transpires that we have the same great grandfather Charles Barrett Dyer, the article having been written by martins son.If anyone can help me to contact Martin Dyer i would be most grateful.Most of my childhood days were spent visiting Golant, and it was marvellous to read of my famillys association with Menabilly as i used to enjoy reading the novels of Daphne du Maurier.
malcolm graham <mac@mac.eurobell.co.uk>
- Thursday, September 23, 1999 at 20:17:56 (BST)
Well, we had to read Rebecca in school( i am in 8th grade ) and ithought the book was very good. NOw i need to do a project on it though and I can'tfind a picture of Manderly on any Daphne du Maurier websites! But still! the book is really good and I would definitely read it again!
Candice <candicechristie@hotmail.com>
- Wednesday, September 22, 1999 at 23:08:37 (BST)
The opinion of sTEPH Murray, expressed so succinctly, is no doubt valid, but one wonders upon what premise it is based. Convincing one of the rightness of such an assessment needs more than an abusive online one liner! Best Wishes.
Sam <SamRim@talk21.com>
- Wednesday, September 22, 1999 at 19:09:38 (BST)
Daphne's books are crap!!!
STEPH mURRAY <steph2@exicite.co.uk>
- Thursday, September 16, 1999 at 19:16:56 (BST)
I like Daphne novels very muvh especially Rebica, birds and don't look now visit my sites : http://hawk-news.homepage.com http://resistance.homepage.com
Ahmed <Egyptianhawk@hotmail.com>
- Thursday, September 16, 1999 at 10:31:31 (BST)
Let's have a contest with Rebecca to see who can come up with the most examples of foreshadowing.
Joanna Hyde <hyde@ns.sympatico.ca>
- Tuesday, September 14, 1999 at 22:32:05 (BST)
Sorry that Meghan and her friend are so unfamiliar with books. Sadly, maybe they have been 'put off' by the school carriculum, which turns reading into a boring 'job of work'. Perhaps later they will have more time to read for pleasure. Many will say what a pleasure, an enjoyable thing reading is. This site is Dedicated to Daphne du Maurier, who could create an imaginary world which (I think anyway!) is bettered by none. Her stories have been made into amazing films; about people's lives-really, about life, and love, and death too! Watching TV or a vid is fine, but nothing that can be seen there can equal what one may imagine reading a book. Especially Daphne, bless her! I hope you come to enjoy books at some point-they can be a very great pleasure when daily lives become difficult. Moving into an imaginary world is no substitute for 'real' life, especially when young, but can be the best sort of recreation. Best Wishes Sam
Sam
- Saturday, September 11, 1999 at 19:21:51 (BST)
We have never read a book and doubtfully ever will but we wouldnt be here if it werent for school!!!!
Meghan& Brit
- Thursday, September 09, 1999 at 20:10:10 (BST)
My mother always talks about the BBC TV adaptation of Rebecca which starred Joanna David. She would love to see it again but can't seem to find it on video anywhere, does anybody know where a video of the BBC series could be purchased from?
Barnaby Wardell
- Saturday, September 04, 1999 at 15:56:22 (BST)
Daphne is my favorite author and I have read all her books many, many times. Frenchman's Creek is my favorite and I was wondering if any one else had seen the recently aired movie the BBC has made. I loved the acting and the setting - just as I had envisioned it. Although disappointed the ending was not true to the story. thanks, Carla.
Carla <baldwin@nystec.com>
- Monday, August 30, 1999 at 15:17:12 (BST)
I have been a loyal reader of Daphne du Maurier since I was a young teen. I believe that I have read almost everything she has ever written. I think that House on the Strand is one of the best of her works. I am still reading some over and over. I am looking for a short story, The Limpets, I cannot remember which collection it appears. I was thrilled to discover so much good information on the web but if anyone can help me find this story, please E mail. Thank you.
Helen Jeanne <meanjeanne@freepcmail.com>
- Saturday, August 28, 1999 at 20:56:21 (BST)
One can't put her books down! I come from Cornwall (now living in Ontario, Canada), and she wrote so much about it and. My husband and myself have just come into contact (doing family research) with an elderly gentleman living in Ontario, who was a friend of Daphne DuMaurier and actually accompanied her to Ireland,where he was working in the mining industry, so she could research one of her books - I believe it was Hungry Hill. Isn't it a small world!
Catherine <roskrow@log.on.ca>
- Thursday, August 26, 1999 at 02:10:47 (BST)
Daphne is one of my favorite authors. I have read her books since I was a young woman and loved them. I must try to read the ones that I haven't so far. She must have been a great person to know.
Sarah
- Wednesday, August 25, 1999 at 13:43:53 (BST)
I was glad to find a site dedicated to this wonderful author. The detailed descriptions and intricate plotting in Daphne du Maurier's books have made them among my very favorites. Alas, there are only so many of them, and I have been looking for something similarly good. I've been reading the work of a British author named Robert Goddard who I heard had been called the "heir to Daphne du Maurier" somewhere in the press, and he has some fantastic books with wonderful circular plotting (I highly recommend "Into the Blue" and "Out of the Sun"). I'd really appreciate it if anyone could recommend me similar authors with the same masterful management of plot. Many thanks. Kind regards, Jack.
Jack Friedman. <zephyr102@hotmail.com>
- Tuesday, August 24, 1999 at 03:31:23 (BST)
well played for creating this site i find it very interesting cos i live in cornwall and as every one knows Daphne du Mauriers books were uselly written about Cornwall i have read Jamacia inn ans also been there! i am now reading 'My Cousin Rachel' and am finding it very good! If Daphne du Maurier was still alive and i got to meet her all i could say to her would be Congratulations! for her work becoming so sucsessfull!
Rosie Maguire <Rosiem1985@yahoo.com>
- Friday, August 20, 1999 at 18:30:46 (BST)
I find Daphne du Maurier books to be some of the best I have read. I had read Jamaica Inn, before I made a trip to Cornwall. Our trip included a visit to Jamaica Inn. We traveled most of West Cornwall and drove by Daphne's du Mauriers house. What an exciting moment. Love her books and have known of them for many years. Read some as a teenager a long time ago. She has a way of embedding in your mind a good picture of Cornwall. I am looking for some of her books and am slowly finding them. Janice
Janice Gefre
- Sunday, August 15, 1999 at 23:03:49 (BST)
I find Daphne du Maurier books to be some of the best I have read. I had read Jamaica Inn, before I made a trip to Cornwall. Our trip included a visit to Jamaica Inn. We travel most of West Cornwall and drove by Daphne's du Mauriers house. What an exciting moment. Love her books and have known of them for many years. Read some as a teenager a long time ago. She has a way of embedding in your mind a good picture of Cornwall. I am looking for some of her books and am slowly finding them. Janice
Janice Gefre
- Sunday, August 15, 1999 at 23:02:00 (BST)
Cleaning out mother-in-law's house and found two first edition books by Daphne Du Maurier: "My Cousin Rachel" with no jacket cover in good condition and "The King's General" with jacket cover in good condition. Can anyone provide information on value of either or both books. Thank you
Kristen McInnis <jmac0047@aol.com>
- Sunday, August 15, 1999 at 00:23:21 (BST)
I have been up nearly all night for the past two nights, reading Hungry Hill, which I found at a yard sale. It is a beautifully written, eerily compelling story, old fashioned but timeless. Some of the outstanding aspects of the book: It is obviously set in Ireland, with trips "across the water" to England, but the country name is never mentioned - reminiscent of Rebecca's unnamed main character. DuMaurier strikingly depicts the power of love to bestow happiness and fulfillment - and then shows the crushing destruction of character when untimely death steals that love away. As with Charlotte Bronte's books, it fascinates me to read about people living 'modern' lives in the 19th century - without any of conveniences of today, like electricity, phones, cars, machines. Amazingly, even without these inventions, the characters in this book - members of the ruling class - don't seem to lead very different lives from our own. In some ways, our high-speed lives seem MORE risky and dangerous. Anyway, I'm off to the library, to see what other books of Daphne's I can borrow. Rebecca, of course, has been a favorite all my life.
Barbara Stokes <stokes@ballardspahr.com>
- Tuesday, August 03, 1999 at 21:57:53 (BST)
Daphne's stories are so compelling and eerie I can read them over again and get so caught up in the characters and whatis happening ,it is like reading them for the first time,the excitementof not knowing how it is all going to end.My favourite is Rebecca which I have enjoyed many times and still feel hopeful for a happy ending.
Sharon
- Thursday, July 29, 1999 at 23:25:24 (BST)
I gather this site is new, and I'm delighted to find it! I've loved Daphne's writing since teenage (I'm sixty now),but the romance,and darkness of some of the stories affect me as fiercely as they did when I was an impressionable teenager. As a talking point, may I offer my three 'favourite' books. I wonder if anyone will agree with me; My Cousin Rachel', who to this day I cannot categorize as good or evil! 'The House on the Strand',which absolutely terrifies and horrifies me with its depiction of the insidious power of 'drugs' and the slow loss of personal 'integrity' and, almost inevitably-'Rebecca. I've seen the film countless times- but Mrs Danvers never fails to give me the creeps! And who always comes to mind as the unseen Rebecca-Vivian Leigh! I visited Fowey in May for the du Maurier Festival of Art and Literature ( which maybe sounds stuffy but wasn't!), and it was a wonderful experience, everything I'd hoped for in interest and variety!. My fellow guests at the 'Safe Harbour' have all booked en block for next year! Regards to fellow devotees! Sam
Sam Rimington <SamRim@talk21.com>
- Tuesday, July 27, 1999 at 20:13:45 (BST)
Hello Daphne-fans all over the world! I am writing my PHD on the novels of Daphne and would be glad about any contact with others who are deeply interested in her work - to exchange ideas, to discuss her work, to talk with others who think that she is really a brilliant and far to long neglected (from literary sciences, that is) story-teller.
Maren Bonacker <Maren.Bonacker@anglistik.uni-giessen.de>
- Thursday, July 22, 1999 at 07:59:23 (BST)
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